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Jun.8th Sartorially Bland

I just literally spent an hour plus going through thousands of photos looking for a very particular few, with no recollection of when I took them, what memorable event might have followed or preceded this, or even what time of year it had been at the time. No, no clues at all other than a vague and rather uncertain timeframe of the past two years as when I definitely should have taken these in no way remarkable, important or even good photos. First I rummaged through the Galaxy folder on my laptop, hoping these would be among the images I'd imported at some point during one of my android de-clutters, sadly with no luck. Then I moved on to my actual mobile phone, resisting the impulse to scroll through months worth of photos even if they didn't look promising, until finally, there they were. End of February 2013 is when I'd originally had this thought and the opportunity to illustrate it had been right in front of me, so I acted.

It would be far beyond even my occasionally awe-inspiring ability to store and recall a vast volume of trivial daily information, to give an accurate, let alone honorable reason as to why I didn't pen and publish those thoughts back then. I can't remember. But I can presume. For one - procrastination, of which I am guilty more days out of the year than not. Secondly – falling out of a technological routine, the resumption of which always seems like a monumental undertaking, much like running. You may have been breezing through 5km daily in the summer, but fast forward half a year from what you thought would only be a week long break, and completing a single lap feels like the presence of EMTs at the finish-line, ready to resuscitate you, is only wise. Point being, these things don't just magically materialize.

There are no fairies hovering above my head while I sleep, typing up what I would like to say, or elves then researching support material and converting all of it into a web-friendly format. No, sometimes even the most menial of tasks end up devouring hours, making the process of wanting to express a simple thought an exercise in patients, dedication and preternatural time management skills. Basically, this takes an incredible amount of time to happen, which I don't always have, and when I do my best and there's still no end in sight, sometimes I get bored, despair and need a break. I'm saying this because the actual subject of this post might otherwise seem underwhelming after such a thorough intro.

sartorial clones
  Sartorial clones (photo: Olga Rattik)

The image that had caught my attention was of three teenage girls who I happened to catch sight of one late February afternoon, during a bus ride downtown. They didn't seem to be friends, acquaintances maybe, but most likely they just went to the same school. I couldn't help but smirk because there were actually two more girls who I wish would have remained standing next to this group of three, but who had walked further down the bus where it was less crowded. I was witness to a micro representation of something that I've been finding amusing at best and frustrating or even infuriating at worst, on a much grander scale for the past couple of years. Hordes of women wearing the exact same thing or the exact same combination of things, give or take a brand or three, during a time of massive supply, consumption and choice, or so it seems.

 

The primary culprits of this would be teenagers, with the number of offending parties declining in every following age group, based on casual observation of course. This should be baffling since music, film and virtually every other aspect of pop culture, fashion included, is no longer made for adults in mind, but for children with the attention span of a goldfish and no more curiosity about the world than which angle best works for a selfie. But actually, these are the very reason why despite having entire industries cater to their taste, so many teenagers look like they couldn't muster a single original statement in any of the platforms at their disposal. It's a bit frightening that the relevance and general public opinion on anything is now measured by what's trending or gone viral on social media, which in a

case of quantity over quality, is largely fueled by bored, unmotivated kids whose judgement is easily dictated by a peer of sufficient importance, thus the masses follow “Coz that's what Chloe said and omg I totes agree.”

 

Back to the girls on the bus. There may have been just three of them right in front of me, but there will have been hundreds more out and about in the city at the same time as me, wearing the exact same god forsaken khaki to olive colored parka, leggings, combat boots, with the occasional UGG or Chuck Taylor variant, and brown faux leather hipster messenger bag. Once the weather warms up, these same girls will uniformly switch to wearing 80's distressed skinny jeans with a polyvinyl bomber jacket assembled by a barefoot Bangladeshi orphan in a filthy basement that may well have collapsed on itself by the time said jacket was actually sold, and a sassy T-shirt declaring what a bad girl the wearer is or her adoration for either New York or Paris, it's usually one or the other. Moving on to summer, the dismal, lighter weight cousin of the parka, the utility jacket, in the same exact colours, will be worn over a crop top with high-waisted ripped jeans, the same footwear and accessories apply. Another popular option would be a pastel or neon coloured polyester high-low dress or skirt, often pleated, with a tank top and ballet flats, and if she's feeling particularly casual, she'll opt for white or pink denim shorts, flip-flops and a T-shirt with an owl on it (or some other woodland creature du jour). Sound familiar? Thought so.

The question is WHY? Why, given all the choice in the world, must trends that weren't that good to begin with get absolutely killed because so many people seem to be incapable of thinking for themselves? Worse still, someone decided that sporting a bad carbon copy of a look Emma Watson wore five years ago makes you a fashionista. What? No! Trends by definition have a very short lifespan, that period of time during which they're actually fashionable is usually over at the snap of a finger and they become laughable, dated and uncool overnight. In my book perpetuating a fashion corpse is a bigger offense than just being clueless and going to work or school like you've gotten dressed in the dark. Those people don't know any better, while the others seem to think they're actually superior and stylish. Really? If you're wearing a look that was cool for a month two years to half a decade ago, you are sadly not, quite literally, an authority on what's in.

 

Make mistakes, wear things that don't make sense, avoid buying clothes that you've seen on someone you interact with frequently, or if you really love a popular piece, make it special and make it your own. Break free from this generation-wide case of tunnel vision, be quirky, have fun and have an individual point of view. Even if your style isn't everybody's cup of tea, it sure as hell beats being generic! Just a thought...

O.-
 

2013

Jun.14th Galliano/Rose

Recently I came across an exciting piece of news, announcing an interview I'd been waiting to see for nearly three years. Yes, somewhere among the impressive melange of subjects the Daily Mail report on (they will have a minute by minute recap of 'Britain's Got Talent', daily coverage of Kim Kardashian's trips to the gym, heartbreaking images of a leprosy village in China and the most current coverage of breaking news, such as the Boston marathon bombing and the subsequent FBI terrorist hunt), a snippet announcing John Galliano's interview with Charlie Rose caught my eye.

John Galliano is without a doubt one of my all time favorite fashion designers and needless to say I was in a state of disbelief when footage of his drunken racist, antisemitic ramblings in a Parisian bar emerged in 2010, creating a wave of public shock and scorn. As a result, not only did he lose his place as creative director and couturier of the house of Christian Dior, he also lost all rights to his own label, and was effectively abandoned by everyone in the fashion industry. Everyone but a precious few. These few included the almighty Anna Wintour and Oscar de la Renta, who is said to have had a hand in arranging the Charlie Rose interview.

 

I haven't always been a fan of Galliano's over the top and often too ostentatious, even for me, collections, but taste evolves with time and there is such a thing as appreciating someone's work regardless of wether it is accompanied by a desire to own it. I became more familiar with his work while doing research for a menswear line, and what ended up impressing me more than his style, was his demeanor in interviews. Now, he's since admitted to being drunk and medicated when interacting with the media, but I have to say, he did an incredible job of concealing it.

The impression I got was that this was someone with a gentle spirit, someone genuinely kind, with a remarkable understanding of women and no greater desire than to drape them in luxury. So what on Earth happened to cause such a fall from grace?

 

The format of a Charlie Rose interview is quite unforgiving. It's him and his guest sitting at a round table in a black room for nearly an hour, with no commercial breaks or distracting graphics. The first interview of his I ever saw was with maestro Valery Gergiev. While I anticipated a lengthy discussion of classical music, the subjects quickly moved on to history – the comparison of the then Kirov Orchestra of Leningrad and the Mariinsky of modern St. Petersburg, and of course one of the most celebrated orchestras of all time, The LSO –, politics – Gergiev being an Ossetian and a close friend of Vladimir Putin -, and education – him using his influence and celebrity to promote music in schools as well as helping The International Tchaikovsky Competition regain its prestige.

Another favorite of mine was Rose's interview with Carl Sagan in 1996. It starts off discussing Sagan's battle with cancer and his resolute belief in there not being an afterlife, but continues on to the importance of space exploration, the controversy of NASA's funding and the acknowledgement of the sheer scale of technological progress that the Cold War fueled, which has undeniably withered since. As Rose points out, his guests can include anyone from the field of art and design, to science and politics, the choice is really driven by his curiosity of the human condition. All the better for myself and anyone else who shares this curiosity.


Without giving too much away, John's interview was certainly a difficult one for him to give. Not that you get a sense that Rose is picking sides, but perhaps he is? This is not the flamboyant and eloquent post-show Galliano, taking great pride in talking about his in-depth research of the era or persona behind his latest work. I think what you see is worry and fear, fear of relapsing and the very real fear of maybe never getting the chance to do what he was put on this Earth to do, despite his, I believe, genuine atonement. I hope with time he is granted the second chance he so badly wants. I think he is very much missed.

-O.
 
 

May 29th How to make your bag Happy!

 

Lately I've been watching a lot of youtube beauty guru videos, my newest obsession, and about a month ago, one of them actually inspired me to do something. Now, I could get all jealous on another subject, mainly that of how much stuff people have! But I won't... Would I like to have more things than I currently have? Yes. But, the possessions I do own, I've put a lot of care and consideration into actually getting and am therefor extremely happy with. Which is actually the point of this post - how to give something you really like and already have a new, fresh twist. Although, this may be one of the rare occasions I'd prefer the motto more is more, or at least, a little bit more would be nice.

Onwards. The video in question was made by Cassandra Bankson (who became famous with this video) about how to accessorize a relatively classic bag to make it more fun. I personally wouldn't use any of the exact ways she's sassed up her purses, with the exception of the LV scarf on an LV bag, but that's not really anything new, a lot of bags actually come with scarves already attached to them, however, she did inspire me to do SOMETHING about the bag I currently have.

A little bit about my current bag – it's a black, leather DKNY hobo I've had and have worn almost every day, every season for three years. What I loved about it is that essentially it came as two bags, I've never, ever worn the illusion pocket one with the hobo, I use it as a clutch or small cross body purse on its own. It just seems useless to me when attached to the big bag, all it does is add more weight.

I love hobo bags because of their casual slouchiness, you can have them so full the zipper barely closes, or have just a wallet, a comb and sunglasses in it, and it looks more or less the same. I love that it's simple, well made, diverse and that it has one strap. For some reason, perhaps I have strangely shaped shoulders, whenever a bag has two straps, one keeps falling off, driving me absolutely bonkers. As much as I think it was a great investment piece, clearly I've gotten a lot of use out of this bag, it is quite worn already. The rose metal beneath the gold hardware is showing, the leather on the bottom is quite scratched up with wear marks etc... And, as lovely as it is, after a while you want something different to look at. So, I decided to take inspiration from my current, and most long lasting purse crush yet, the Lanvin Happy Bag.

My DKNY My DKNY
  My DKNY hobo bag (photo: Olga Rattik)   How I actually wear my bag (photo: Olga Rattik)

I could write poetry about this bag. Okay, not really (or could I?). It's just so... Lovely. And it promises happiness! Okay, not really (or maybe?). There's always about one each collection I get attached to, an undecided neutral metallic (it can't make up its mind on if it's grey, gold, silver or bronze, which I love) in some sort of fancy (or imitation) reptile leather. I've never actually seen and touched one in person, and it's for the best. For now. I don't want to fall any more deeply in love with it and neither do I want to deal with the disappointment should it not be everything I've dreamt it to be. For the time being, let it serve as a healthy ambition, and inspiration for this DIY project.

happy bag materials
  The materials I used, conveniently spread out on Lanvin by Dean L. Merceron (photo: Olga Rattik)

What I did is I looked at the design elements one would immediately associate with a Lanvin bag: a large chain strap, vintage maison charm and silk grosgrain ribbon. Easy enough. I went to a local haberdashery and got a large gold chain and some carabiner clasps to attach it to the bag; two charms, the face and back of which came separately, so I just hot glued them together with a glue gun and later hung them on the previously mentioned chain; then I got distracted and got another chain because I thought it was so cool – like a serpent or something, and before even knowing how to work it, I'd decided it would make for an awesome tassel. Which it did, and although it's not a Lanvin design element, it is one of mine, and I thought my reflector tassel could use a friend; and finally, a midnight blue, silk grosgrain ribbon (it's almost the exact colour as my winter coat, which I loathed at the time, but they didn't have black so now I squint and pretend it's not blue). The only other tools I used were some pliers, links to create and attach the tassel and charms, and one safety pin to secure the bow that I just tied onto the bag. Voila!

A Happy DKNY
A Happy DKNY hobo bag (4x photo: Olga Rattik) :

This all cost me about 16€ or 20-something USD. I wish it had been a bit less, but I still saved a lot of money by using cheap, slave labour (myself). So there it is - a little, easy makeover of a much loved classic, as inspired by Cassie and Maison Lanvin.

 
-O.
 
 
 

Mar.30th Cold Fashion Frustration

 

Complaining about the weather is something I generally don't participate in. I find it counterproductive. After years of living in this climate, it should hardly come as a surprise that what most people would consider winter, can really last up to nine months here, and what most would consider nuclear winter is just December (and January, and February, and what do you know, this year it's March too). But no matter how frequently, how hard or how many people complain about the lack of warmth and sunshine, it's not going to happen until it's meant to happen. So, rather than waste my breath, I try my best to dress appropriately and face whatever Mother Nature decides to throw at us with patience and class. However, everyone's patience has a limit and I've just about reached mine. It's not the cold, the ice or snow. No, it's what the cold and icy snow is forcing me to wear – my coat.

  Olga Rattik (photo: Marin Sild)

Personally, I only have one coat that's appropriate to wear in situations of -25C to +5C (not even, but I do), and I've been wearing it every time I walk out the door since early November (with the exception of exactly two days, when I wore something old for a couple of quick and impossible to postpone dashes out, while my actual coat was in the wash). Ideally, one should have three coats minimum per season, two in practical colours, like grey and black to go back and forth between, and one in a vibrant, exciting colour you absolutely love but would get horribly bored with should you have to wear it daily. I, like most people, have just the one. I want to say it's a financial choice, but really, if I think back at how I got the coat I've been wearing for five straight months now, it was the right style, material, colour and fit and with all those boxes ticked, money was no object. And honestly, if I saw anything now or at any given moment, even if it wasn't the appropriate season, that too had all those things, money would still be no object. I'd get it, simply because it is an absolute investment and, clearly, the price per wear is a bargain. So what it actually comes down to is a famine of options.


In a time when fashion is so fast, so constant and global, it shouldn't be so hard to find good wardrobe staples. And why should they be just “good” and not “great”? Although I may be more knowledgeable of the technical aspects of clothing compared to the average person, I don't have any impossible demands when it comes to my choices. In fact, it's nothing I learned at university, it's how my mother taught me to look at clothes. The quality of design, patter, cut, fit, material and execution, the basic components that go into the creation of any garment. The matter of price becomes a factor much later. If one or more of those is unsatisfactory, I won't settle and I don't. Why should I? Why should anyone?


But I've veered off course... So there I was in late March, looking outside the window at the sunny, Scandinavian day, well aware it was still below zero despite the treacherous rays, thinking, if I had to put my midnight blue, padded shell coat on one more time, I could quite literally scream. I wanted to wear something else, anything else, a different shape, a different fabric... I want to be able to wear light wool or a trench coat, then a leather jacket and then to not have to wear a jacket, I want to be able to wear footwear without worrying about drowning them in a freezing puddle that's hiding underneath what looks like solid ice. That is the nature of my frustration, not the actual degrees. A change of diet, a need for choices! So I decided, that was it, if it was -2C or warmer, I'd risk pneumonia and wear my wool spring coat and heels. Lo and behold, it was -1C, so I had to do it!

 

I carefully dusted off my wool, full skirt kimono coat, borrowed an embroidered jersey belt from a French Connection tunic dress to help make it fit, wore black stockings with crinkled silk ankle boots, a latex bag, accessorized of course with my patented tassel reflector, and black leather gloves with bows from Mango. Including my dress, I wore six different textures of black. Now that may not scream spring to most, but to me it did. I don't necessarily associate spring with wearing more colour, but I do associate it with being less practical and more feminine. For a few brief days I got to do just that. It felt neither cold nor warm, it was cool. A much needed break from my trusty winter coat, which I still really like, and can live with having to wear for a couple of more weeks after my little vacation from it =).

-O.
 
 
 
 
 

Mar.26th The Oscars - take two!

 

The Academy Awards are arguably the most glamorous and highly anticipated catwalk/red carpet extravaganza of the year. It's the place where nothing is too opulent, no corse is tight enough and no skirt is too poufy. Hooray! Oh, and films and people who make them get some sort of prize... I think. This is really the one place celebrities can be brave and unapologetically glamorous, and one of the few places the most awe-inspiring creations, that take a team of 20 people thousands of hours to make in an attic overlooking Montmartre, can actually see the light of day and the flashes of cameras, to make even the most fashion-clueless person weak in the knees.

 

Unfortunately, despite being preceded by a rather interesting season of haute couture and ready-to-wear, plenty to choose from, this year's red carpet has got to be the most horrendously boring I've ever seen. It may be difficult to understand, because it's not like anybody (that I will mention) looked “bad”, or didn't look “good”, it's that the vast majority of what you would generally classify as “good” looked just “nice”. “Nice” equals “okay” which equals “blah” which equals “unmemorable”, and “unmemorable” is not something one should strive for when there's a billion people watching, and you, supposedly, are a star, which is worthless because everyone else is a star too, so effectively, at the Oscars you are a nobody because everyone around you is a somebody.

 

Honestly, for me, there was not enough material to even have a best and worst dressed list. It would be an “everyone looked nice, everyone's a winner (or loser, whichever way you choose to look at it)” list.

Oh how I would have welcomed someone looking awesomely tragic! About as much, if not more, as I yearned to see someone jaw-droppingly gorgeous. Less people know Björk for her music or acting or the two combined, as they do for that swan dress. It's a classic! Now, you may wonder: “wait, that's your definition of good?!” No, I just said it was “tragic”, and “tragic” is SO much better than “good”. It's “fan-friggin-tastic”! So I got to thinking, in order to avoid everyone looking equally bland or shockingly similar (I'll get to the Hathaway/Seyfried situation later on), seeing as The Oscars are a show, there should really be a costume designer for the entire event. Someone whose job it would be to dress everyone there and create an overall cohesive and pleasant visual, including glamour, quirk, avant garde and the essential dose of terribleness. Thus, I have taken it upon myself to do just that. It's the 2013 Academy Awards, take two! I've un -and redressed nearly every female nominee, presenter and performer I could think of and painstakingly tracked down and created 45 new looks (yes, I'm that obsessive). This is my vision, the way I would have done it, so here we go!

  "Elle tombe" (illustration: Olga Rattik)  
     

Charlize Theron on the red carpet and presenting

what she wore

/

what she should have worn

I genuinely like Charlize and her style, both on and off the red carpet, and in my humble opinion she is one of only three actresses capable of pulling off short hair (the other two are Audrey Hepburn and Halle Berry, everyone else, you're delusional, stop it!). She looks great in white, and is there anything particularly wrong with her strapless, peplum mermaid look? Other than the fact that it is strapless, has a peplum and is a mermaid...? Three of the most overdone, imagination deprived designs rolled into one? Yes. Despite what the label says, it is not Dior. I'm not going to argue with the rave reviews or question the quality of the collections by Raf Simons, but to me they are just that- Raf Simons, not Christian Dior. Just like Valentino isn't Valentino and what they are calling Valentino should really be called Chiuri Piccioli (that actually sounds great. They should do that!). Now John Galliano was the embodiment of Dior and when he did Dior, it was Christian Dior, and when he did his own brand, it was John Galliano. There is no one left in the whole of Paris who dares to be as opulent as John was, and I think he is terribly missed by everyone from fashion editors to celebrities to fashion students and everyone in between. When he dressed Charlize, she was a goddess. When Simons dresses her, she just “is”. I would have ignored her obligations to the house of Dior (as the face of J'adore) and put her in the Elie Saab spring/summer 2013 ready-to-wear dress, which is quite similar in that it too is strapless and has an impressive slit, to once again transform her into the goddess that she is.

 

Charlize Theron performing with Channing Tatum

what she wore

/

what she should have worn

First of all, I loved the performance! So old Hollywood but in 2013, love that stuff... Second of all, still not good enough for me to stop this mutiny against Dior. I've once more imagined her in Elie Saab, another dress from the spring/summer 2013 ready-to-wear collection. Again, similar idea, but better execution, largely due to the same, above mentioned reasons.

 

Shirley Bassey performing

what she wore

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what she should have worn

I wasn't abel to find out who Shirley Bassey was wearing and it doesn't really matter. It's a costume. Plain as that. If you're sitting anywhere past 10th row, it's fine. But up close and televised, it really ought to have been something more refined. Still gold, obviously. Which is why I would have had her wear the Zuhair Murad spring/summer 2013 haute couture gown and cape, especially since she's not afraid of illusion mesh (except I bet Zuhair's atelier would have made it fit properly).

 

Shirley Bassey on the red carpet

what she wore

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what she should have worn

If it's leg she wants to show, I would have put Dame Shirley in another creation by Zuhair Murad instead of the fringed Isabel Christianson, a peach strapless dress from his 2013 spring/summer ready-to-wear collection, as a bit of a preview of the performance to come.

 

Kerry Washington on the red carpet and presenting

what she wore

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what she should have worn

The Miu Miu Kerry wore is a tad too busy for me. She's a tiny girl and choosing a straight silhouette isn't something that will accent her best features. I would have loved to have seen her in this outrageous, bold sage Zac Posen creation from his spring/summer 2013 ready-to-wear show. She could have carried it without a problem, and again, she's not nominated, no stress, perfect place to be to have more fun with what you're wearing.

 

Katherine Zeta Jones on the red carpet and presenting

what she wore

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what she should have worn

Katherine's Zuhair Murad is too Vegas for me. She doesn't need all that shimmer, she's breathtaking all on her own, and would have looked sublime in a much more quiet and refined gown by Tony Ward from his spring/summer 2013 couture collection.

 

Jennifer Garner on the red carpet and presenting

what she wore

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what she should have worn

Not a fan of straight dresses and them getting creased and wrinkled in the course of getting to and sitting through a show. I really liked "Argo" and am very happy for its win, so I wish Jennifer would have been like a dazzling, fringed statue herself (either predicting the win or being a consolation prize, depending on how it went), in the gorgeous spring/summer 2012 Marchesa, instead of the custom Gucci she wore.

 

Zoe Saldana on the red carpet and presenting

what she wore

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what she should have worn

Had I been in charge, Zoe would not be in an overly busy and wrinkled Alexis Mabille. No, she'd be wearing the fierce spring/summer 2012 haute couture Givenchy design. I can think of very few people who could pull it off, and she's at the top of my list. I mean, check out the back!

 

Jacki Weaver- best supporting actress nominee

what she wore

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what she should have worn

It's the same general idea (think very general), but the Elie Saab spring/summer 2013 haute couture would have been leaps and bounds better for Jacki than the Rani Zakhem she wore. A world apart. Still looking for a time machine.

 

Naomi Watts- best actress nominee

what she wore

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what she should have worn

You already know I have an issue with silver and sequins, the fit issue with Naomi's Armani is an added bonus though. There's something about the sequin sequence that's bothering me. Also, the entire look is terribly aging. I think the soft taffeta Marchesa from their fall/winter 2013 collection would have been a more flattering look for Naomi, perhaps paired with a Grace Kelly hairstyle.

 

Meryl Streep on the red carpet and presenting

what she wore

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what she should have worn

Meryl essentially wore a silver sequined variation on the gold dress she wore last year, when she won her third Oscar. I loved that look, but this Lanvin creation in grey/silver makes her look so pale, so lifeless and sucked clean of colour. I don't know what it is, maybe it's a filter the cameramen are using? Anyway, I would have loved to have had her wear the 2011 Alexander McQueen resort number, fit for the queen of the art of acting.

 

Jennifer Lawrence- best actress

what she wore

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what she should have worn

I didn't used to have much of an opinion on Jennfer Lawrence (mainly because I've yet to see a single one of her movies), but ever since her wardrobe malfunction at the SAG awards and especially after taking a tumble heading up the stairs to receive her Oscar, I really like her. She doesn't take herself too seriously and that's great (Anne Hathaway used to be like that... Oh no, this may not end well). It was mainly between her and Jessica Chastain, but since she'd won more awards leading up to the Oscars, I'd say she was the favorite. That said, she's only 22, so if she hadn't won, it wouldn't have been a big deal, she'd have other opportunities to have a go at it. That's why instead of wearing the Dior (which she kind of had to because she now models for them, and really that was the biggest dress they made since Simons started designing for them - no brainer, the only option. Under Galliano that would have been nothing, the second look at a ready-to-wear show, easily), I would have gone for something over the top, extravagant and fun – the outrageous feather masterpiece from Alexander McQueen's spring/summer 2011 ready-to-wear collection!

 

Adele on the red carpet

what she wore

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what she should have worn

The black embroidered Jenny Packham dress is such an expected choice for Adele to have made, however, the Grammy Awards proved she was capable of being more adventurous. That is why I would have persuaded her to go for a very similar look, but in white, with genuine Parisian embroidery by Elie Saab from his spring/summer haute couture 2013 collection. With her scarlet lips it would have been gorgeous!

 

Adele performing

what she wore

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what she should have worn

The Burberry dress Adele wore to perform “Skyfall” was essentially the same dress she'd worn on the red carpet but shorter (and apparently heavier). I don't think it was the most flattering length on her and despite her attempt to choose something that would better stand out from the crystal stage decorations, she was still sort of lost. I'm so very proud of my last minute find! I think the 2012 fall/winter ready-to-wear Tony Ward gown would have been sheer perfection for the performance. They would have easily added some three quarter length sleeves to the dress and she would have felt as comfortable and confident as ever. And that dress truly would have stood out on stage and fit the culminating moment in the animation with the scarlet drops of blood dissolving in blue water.

 

Michelle Obama presenting

what she wore

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what she should have worn

Again, silver. It just doesn't work. Nobody looks good in it on screen if there's no other colour to set it off. I would have preferred to have seen Michelle in a much brighter colour, especially since she was on screen of another screen, and something with plenty of detail on the top part of the dress, because that's where the focus was. So instead of the silver Naeem Khan, I would have chosen the bright yellow Zac Posen from his 2013 fall/winter ready-to-wear collection.

 

Queen Latifah on the red carpet and presenting

what she wore

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what she should have worn

This is Queen Latifah, QUEEN Latifah. To a premiere or a dinner at the White House, the Badgley Mischka would have sufficed, but for The Oscars it's just not enough. The dazzling Zuhair Murad spring/summer 2013 haute couture dress of my choosing, however, is a dress fit for royalty.

 

Amanda Seyfried performing

what she wore

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what she should have worn

I can see what they were going for with the medley performance of Les Mis. I had the same idea of dressing the three main female characters in the three colours of the French flag, except I don't understand why as the character with the least amount of character, whose main point was to be sweet, innocent, angelic and simple, they put Amanda in bright red, a colour best reserved for the prostitute of the bunch, no? Well, that's my logic, which is why I would have put her in the white and nude Zuhair Murad spring/summer 2013 haute couture dress, not the scarlet Givenchy.

 

Amanda Seyfried on the red carpet

what she wore

/

what she should have worn

So apparently Amanda's Alexander McQueen was so similar to what Anne Hathaway was going to wear, it was enough for Anne to freak out and change her mind 3 hours before the show. This is silly, especially since neither one of the dresses is particularly good (it's assumed this is what Anne originally chose, but I personally think it may have been this one, simply because it's a far superior dress, with an absolutely gorgeous movement- the material glistens and captures the light and isn't stiff like the other one). The dress does absolutely nothing for Amanda, the colour washes her out, the covered neck is awfully aging and even though it doesn't show up in pictures, it was evident on screen, the fit was not good. The keyhole refused to behave and lie flat on her body and she looked extremely uncomfortable (that did show up in pictures). As one of the youngest and most attractive actresses there, with no pressure of being nominated, I would have put her into something truly eye-catching, flirty and fun. A hot pink and gold fall/winter 2013 Oscar de la Renta, with loose, wavy hair. That is how you steal the limelight from your fellow actresses who did get nominated.

 

Kristin Chenoweth performing

what she wore

/

what she should have worn

A gold, strapless fit and flare. The originality of that is blowing my mind. Come on Kristin, be more daring! Maybe try a little bit of clever gold embroidery placement like this fall/winter 2012 haute couture by Tony Ward?

 

Sally Field- best supporting actress nominee

what she wore

/

what she should have worn

Aging. Aging, aging, aging. They did everything in their power to pick a dress, makeup and hairstyle to stress the fact that Sally is in her 60s. She looks like she's dragging that Valentino around, the poor thing. No, just no. She is a stunning woman and if I had my way, she would have looked as light as a feather and demurely seductive with her hair down, dark eyes and a nude lip, wearing the gown from Marchesa's fall/winter 2013 collection. Another one I wish I could actually go back in time and fix.

 

Anne Hathaway- best supporting actress

what she wore

/

what she should have worn

As mentioned, Anne's overreaction and last minute dress change is, in my opinion, silly. It's silly because she has said countless times how Valentino is such a great personal friend of hers, so if I were going to the Oscars as the favourite, about to experience my moment in personal and professional history, I wouldn't care if someone was wearing something similar, I'd care that I was wearing something made by my (supposed) dear friend, in my moment of glory. If Valentino truly is the Givency to her Audrey, why didn't she just ask him, Valentino the man, not the brand, to design something just for her to wear? As far as I've understood, the old master and the house itself aren't on the best of terms, so for her to opt for something by them and not him or something by him from the archives, is peculiar. And the Prada dress she did end up wearing just infuriates me. It's not a bad dress nor does she look bad in it, but this ridiculous style she's had for roughly a year now, ever since she cut her hair off, is just that – infuriating. This determination to look like a sickly, washed out, straight and flat up and down woman in her forties has got to stop. It doesn't look bad, it's fine, good even, but mostly what it is, is a gigantic waste of potential. It's not like I've had a premonition, I know this because she's looked one thousand times better in the past – she's looked youthful, glamorous, flirty, fun and gorgeous, honestly, like one in a million, and now for some reason, she won't. I wouldn't have chosen neither the Valentino she bailed on nor the Prada she wore. Both are too pale and too simple of a shape. The Prada was wrinkled on the limousine ride over, never mind sitting through a three hour show. Ideally, I would have asked the master himself to create something for her, but if not, I think the white 2012 spring/summer haute couture creation that's completely bare, but totally covered, would have made an Oscar winner worthy statement. Wish I could go back in time.

 

Anne Hathaway performing

what she wore

/

what she should have worn

Again, in my opinion, red should have been reserved for the unfortunate prostitute of the trio, Anne. I mean, Fantine. I wanted to shake her violently by her accentuated narrow shoulders over this droopy, dowdy Armani best reserved for a woman at least a decade older than Anne who's had several children and is desperate to hide the effect they've had on her body. She is NONE of those things, which is why I'm pining over not having been abel to have her instead wear the gorgeous, dark red Vera Wang spring/summer 2013 creation. Just picture it with her hair colour and style. Seriously, someone build me a time machine!

 

Jennifer Hudson on the red carpet

what she wore

/

what she should have worn

Sorry Jennifer, just because you and Roberto seem to have forgotten the Jason Wu gown Michelle Williams wore to last year's Golden Globes, doesn't mean I have. I do like the choice of colour, which is why I'd have chosen the blue dress from Monique Lhuillier's spring/summer 2013 ready-to-wear collection to replace the Roberto Cavalli.

 

Jennifer Hudson performing

what she wore

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what she should have worn

Still not feeling the silver sequined look. Also, the Kaufmanfranco gown is really not doing much for Jennifer's figure. I think with her skin tone she would have looked sublime in the orange sorbet Oscar de la Renta pre fall 2013 gown.

 

Nicole Kidman on the red carpet and presenting

what she wore

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what she should have worn

I love Nicole Kidman. She is the only leading lady with a waist small enough to actually be believable in period costumes. Yeah, they all say how they've been strapped in corsets, barely breathing and so on, but they hardly ever look it on screen. That's why I think the Alexander McQueen spring/summer 2012 creation with exaggerated sharp hips instead of the car show/ magician's assistant L'Wren Scott dress, would have looked spectacular on her.

 

Jane Fonda on the red carpet and presenting

what she wore

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what she should have worn

80's shoulder-pads and optical embroidery only looks fashionable on a 17 year old model, maybe. On anyone else it just looks like it's from the 80s and whoever is wearing it didn't have the money or the sense to get anything new for the event. Jane is a living legend and I would have so, so loved to have put her in the sort of Galactic Queen of Everything Alexander McQueen fall/winter 2012 creation instead of the somewhat unfortunate in every way yellow Versace... I think she could pull it off!

 

Barbra Streisand performing

what she wore

/

what she should have worn

I remember going through what felt like every collection by every designer, ever, and stopping at that Givency fall/winter 2012 couture look and thinking I wish there was someone to wear it (oh that gorgeous back). It's a tricky look, on a young actress it would be too heavy, someone older might not have the body for it, but then I saw Barbra performing and thought it would have been perfect for her, so that's what I would have chosen for her instead of the Donna Karan gown.

 

Melissa McCarthy on the red carpet and presenting

what she wore

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what she should have worn

I think Melissa should be introduced to Jean Paul Gaultier. They are both hysterical and I'm sure he could have created a custom variation on the fall/winter 2012 haute couture look to suit her personality so much better than the just there David Meister gown she wore.

 

Kristen Stewart on the red carpet and presenting

what she wore

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what she should have worn

With Kristen's dark, loose hair the rich shades of red and pink of the Zuhair Murad 2012 fall/winter ready-to-wear dress would have looked far more sublime than the disheveled, oddly constructed Reem Acra in the strange and unflattering shade of yellow (supposedly it was meant to be white, but I see yellow). The crutches would have still been an impossible accessory to pull off (she really wanted to be there, huh? I wonder why...?), but crutches or not, a degree of pain and discomfort would have still been on Kristen's face with or without them, in perfect health or not, because Kristen in a dress, is Kristen in a dress.

 

Jennifer Aniston on the red carpet and presenting

what she wore

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what she should have worn

There's just something too princessy and not age or character appropriate about that Valentino gown. I would have opted for a more vampy and daring design, still in red, like the 2012 fall/winter haute couture Zuhair Murad.

 

Samantha Barks performing

what she wore

/

what she should have worn

I would have kept Samantha in blue, but unlike the Jenny Packham she wore, I would have opted for a much more bright and sparkling number, like the spring/summer 2013 ready-to-wear Elie Saab, to show that idiot Marius what he's missing.

 

Samantha Barks on the red carpet

what she wore

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what she should have worn

Samantha has an absolutely astounding figure! That black Valentino is simply not Oscars material. Premiere, as an unknown, sure. Oscars, nooo! As another young, carefree non-nominee, her ridiculously miniscule waist would have looked breathtaking in the calf-length fall/winter 2013 Marchesa! This is one of the few dresses I actually wish I could go back in time and get her to wear, somehow. It would have been a match made in heaven!

 

Amy Adams- best supporting actress nominee

what she wore

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what she should have worn

Mr. de la Renta, Amy- not cool you two, not cool. Not because it's an unfortunate dress, but because of the one hundred similarities too many it bares to the truly stunning original Versace gown Penelope Cruz wore when nominated for "Volver". True, it in turn has much in common with the iconic dress of one thousand layers that Carrie falls asleep in waiting for Petrovsky, but they're both Versace! There's nothing wrong with improving upon and evolving your own designs, another matter is doing it to someone else's. The colour of Amy's Oscar de la Renta is rather unflattering as well, which is why I pictured her in the Zuhair Murad fall/winter 2012 haute couture gown in blue, complimenting her pale skin and red hair.

 

Reese Witherspoon on the red carpet and presenting

what she wore

/

what she should have worn

My choice of Giambattista Valli spring/summer haute couture 2013 is better for the following reasons- it's still taffeta, it's pink (and we all think of pink when we think of Reese, fact), it's pants AND a dress, it's a statement, and it would have done a far better job of flattering Reese's figure. Honestly, I think Reese is beautiful and has a great body, baby or no baby, but the custom Louis Vuitton is making it look like she doesn't.

 

Norah Jones on the red carpet

what she wore

/

what she should have worn

Sorry everyone, but I am just hating grey, silver and gunmetal in dress form for some reason. Everybody who wore any of those looked like the colour was sucking the life out of them, especially on screen but in photos too. Besides that, the Tadashi Shoji dress would have been a better choice for Norah were she in her 50s (and she'd be a knockout, a 50 year old knockout, but a knockout still). I think the romantic Giambattista Valli spring/summer 2013 haute couture would have suited her age and personality far better.

 

Norah Jones performing

what she wore

/

what she should have worn

Keeping the general idea of the Romona Keveza Norah wore to perform, I would have gone instead for the flirty, romantic and lushly embellished spring/summer 2013 Dior haute couture cocktail dress. If you can find video of that dress in the fashion show, do check it out, the embroidery is breathtaking in movement and the way it captures light. The picture doesn't do it justice.

 

Halle Berry on the red carpet and presenting

what she wore

/

what she should have worn

Halle Berry would introduce the 50 years of Bond tribute, so that's what she told Donatella Versace she wanted to look like – a Bond girl. Really, that's the only excuse I can think of for that dress, the sort of expected tackiness and lack of taste that comes with the look of such a creature. I'm still so disappointed none of the truly big starlets have worn dresses from Donatella's first return to couture collection in 2012. I was biting my nails, praying and hoping Angelina Jolie would have worn one of them last year, because it was well known she would be wearing Versace. But she didn't. Sadly. Although the leg thing was amusing. So why oh why couldn't Halle have worn something from that collection now?! If it's custom she wants, it could have even been in a different colour, but my god would she have rocked that dress from Versace's 2012 spring/summer couture show. Again, wish I could go back in time and make it happen.

 

Salma Hayek on the red carpet and presenting

what she wore

/

what she should have worn

I'm sorry, but Salma looks like she's being choked. The Alexander McQueen gown is very strangely proportioned on her – the way the embellishment is placed, the way it divides her body and emphasizes her height (or rather lack of it). Another terribly aging look with the hair and makeup as well. As she had neither the pressure to perform or of being nominated, I would have had Salma wear something much more fun, like the fuchsia and green 2013 spring/summer ready-to-wear dress by Oscar de la Renta.

 

Sandra Bullock on the red carpet and presenting

what she wore

/

what she should have worn

I would have chosen a similar, but somewhat more sheer dress for Sandra, replacing the Elie Saab with an Oscar de la Renta from his fall/winter 2013 ready-to-wear collection.

 

Renee Zellweger on the red carpet and presenting

what she wore

/

what she should have worn

Let's all imagine Renee would wear something that's not by Carolina Herrera. I know, it's near impossible. You're thinking, are you insane?? That's what you'd have her wear?! Yes! Why?! Look at the side of that dress, it's practically nonexistent! Jean Paul Gaultier is always on the verge of terrible taste, this spring/summer 2013 haute couture dress is the closest thing to reasonable I could find. But despite being risque, I think it would have worked wonders for Renee. Can you name a movie she's been in in the past five years? Critically acclaimed or commercially successful? Thought so. Don't worry, I would have used plenty of strategically placed, double-sided tape to keep everyone on their toes, but no more than that. This would have been so beyond your regular styling, this is effectively stylist/publicist territory – I guarantee she would have been on the cover of everything had she worn that dress!

 

Emmanuelle Riva- best actress nominee

what she wore

/

what she should have worn

I would have dressed Emmanuelle in something with a little bit more draping and character to it, like the Alexander McQueen pre fall 2013 look, something with a degree more visual impact than the straight Lanvin cape she wore.

 

Jessica Chastain- best actress nominee

what she wore

/

what she should have worn

I haven't seen any of the ladies' performances but on a personal level I was rooting for Jessica to win. I really liked her in “The Help”, thought she was just darling, and was even more pleased to learn she was a redhead! Unlike everyone who's under contract with some fashion house (which I've entirely ignored here) Jessica wore a copper embroidered Armani. It was okay (the fit was not, what's up Armani? That's two for two). Jessica is now the face of Yves Saint Laurent, whose design department are having a bit of a rough patch ever since Stefano Pilati left. What I would have done is tracked down an archival haute couture piece by Yves himself to mark the beginning of this partnership, something like the look from his spring/summer 2001 haute couture show. It would have been totally unexpected and original and quite possibly breathtaking.

 

Octavia Spencer on the red carpet and presenting

what she wore

/

what she should have worn

I think Octavia has had a number of memorable light, creamy and glittery Tadashi Shoji moments, which is why I would have loved to have seen her in something different. Something like the 2013 fall/winter ready-to-wear Zac Posen look in rich burgundy.

 

Helen Hunt- best supporting actress nominee

what she wore

/

what she should have worn

Sorry Helen, I can appreciate the thought behind choosing an H&M dress, but not how it turned out. For goodness sake, it looks like it just came out of the dryer (did it??). The colour is fantastic, which is why I chose something in the same midnight blue but with finer attention to detail, by Monique Lhuillier from her pre fall 2013 collection.

 

Quvenzhané Wallis-best actress nominee

what she wore

/

what she should have worn

As young as she is, I felt Quvenzhané's look could have been slightly less childish than it was. Instead of the Armani, I would have opted for something like the plum dress from Jenny Packham's fall/winter 2013 ready-to-wear collection, custom made for the little starlet of course.

As for the show itself, I think it's probably the best I've ever seen! Seth MacFarlane could well become the new Billy Crystal. I really hope he hosts again. He's funny, has such a quick wit, an amazing voice and is charming in spades. I laughed at the jokes, swooned at the musical numbers and barely fast forwarded through any of the acceptance speeches. All in all, the three plus hours just flew by. Can't wait for next year's show. Hopefully we'll see some amazing films and amazing style.

-O.
 
 

Feb.27th Lets get the reception over with


Hailed as the most glamorous and prestigious event in the social calendar among the crème de la crème of Estonia, the Independence Day President's Reception is our equivalent of the biggest night in the world of glamour, The Oscars (coincidentally, this year they were on the same day even). Wether you're interested in fashion or not, critiquing the “runway” is a national sport. Why? Because it's dead easy. The overwhelming percentage of bad choices is so bluntly obvious, you can be a truck driver, a pharmacist or a salad chef and the odds you will successfully determine wether or not someone is well dressed, are unanimously in your favour. I'm almost disappointed that people place so much value on this event as the biggest night in fashion, because if that's THE night and there's nothing better to come, my god, you can keep it.

 

 

Bickering over etiquette is a sort of subdivision of the sport. Personally, I can't believe that there are still people out there with the energy to preach the “a lady mustn't bare her shoulders” rule. Really? I can understand taking a dig at someone for the inappropriate plunging necklines, overly tight and revealing corsets, or wearing colours best not attempted after the age of four... But really, shoulders? And my favourite, the “it's NOT a ball, therefor a ball gown is entirely inappropriate”. Is it? Not to say that the women are blameless, far from it, in fact they may just deserve everything the internet commentators have to throw at them, but what about the men? Dress codes are assigned to men, in this particular case the options are black tie (or dark suit), military uniform or folk clothing, and their dates have to match their choice. If he wears folk clothes, she has to. If he wears a suit, she has to wear a floor length dress (although, I distinctly remember a few years back it was calf length. Maybe if the etiquette police made up their minds, people wouldn't make these “mistakes”?). A ball would generally mean white tie for the men and ball gowns for the ladies. But this isn't a ball, this is a reception. And yet, almost every minister, member of parliament, athlete or actor or anyone else who has received a cool order to tie around their neck, throws etiquette right out the window and shows up in full white tie and tails. Gentlemen, you look ridiculous. We have 20 women in parliament and only one female minister. Clearly, whatever issues we're having as a result of the government's work is largely the men's doing, so maybe consider redirecting your arrows at them and give the women a break on the etiquette front? Just a thought...

 

Over the years I've completely given up hope this red carpet event will ever truly showcase the best of Estonian fashion. It's never going to happen. Why? I don't know. I don't know what happens when someone decides to seek out a designer based on their work, to commission one of the most photographed dresses they will ever wear, with clear influences from their previous collections, ending up looking like a right mess.

In practice, the minute you commission something that doesn't exist, you become the world expert on fashion, and since you're paying for it, you feel like it's your right to insist on any changes that pop into your pretty little head. Frankly, there's not a single designer in Estonia who'd have the luxury to say “right, I can't put my name on this. Take your money and go”. To some degree, it's as simple as that. If I can't convince you that if we do what you want your arms will look short, your hips will look wide, you'll have no waist and that colour will make your skin look grey, then sucks for me, cause I need the cash. I am not about to tell a plumber how to do their job, nor would I pick up a saw or scalpel or attempt to change a car battery, so why people feel it's their right to shamelessly interfere and distrust designers or stylists is beyond me.

 

To roundup this year's parade of dresses, I am happy to say that after more than a decade of the unhealthy obsession with taffeta, the Estonian social elite have moved on to chiffon and satin in pursuit of new and impressive ways to look their absolute worst (what? I was really worried there for a while!). Why would anyone, knowing they would be sitting for hours in the dress, choose to wear satin, especially a straight line silhouette? I mean anyone (that's right Anne Hathaway, you're next)? If the dress isn't wrinkled after you walk downstairs, I guarantee it will be after you sit in the car, never mind sitting through a concert. By the time it's your turn to walk up and shake the President's and First Lady's hand, you'll look like you need a proper steam. Also, despite having been on the market for two and a half years (I think. I remember there being a press event roughly that long ago), the ladies here haven't a clue as to what Spanx are and what they can do for you, never mind the fine art of double and triple Spanx...

 

I've come up with three categories: chiffon abuse- exhibits one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine and ten-, satin abuse- one, two, three, four, five, six, seven- and wtf (what the fudge, keeping it classy)- one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight.

 

Of course, the crown jewel of the final category is the First Lady's dress fiasco. I think it's funny. Not the situation itself, nor the outrage it's causing, but the fact that this and this, yes, are similar in many ways, simply aren't in the same league to ever be compared. The “best” of Estonian craftsmanship, when shown next to genuine Parisian couture, with everything from fit, details and final execution, looks like it needs to quickly retreat to the shadows whence it came, in hopes of retaining any shred of dignity. The fact that the Dior is worn by a tall and slender model with proper stilettos, isn't helping our First Lady one bit. And lets face it, even Galliano borrowed inspiration from the original Givanchy creation. I do find it rich however, that local designers would be so openly outraged over design theft, because every dress that isn't a disaster, but a regular “blah”, nothing special, fits okay, looks sort of nice at the reception, can be traced back to some world class designer. Like this one compared to this one, which is a multilayer comparison, seeing as the Giambattista Valli Emma wore to the 2012 Oscars, was itself a lesser version of the Balenciaga Nicole Kidman wore in 2007.

 

As most years, there was exactly one person who looked stunning head to toe, who stood out and stuck in my mind. Sometimes, there's even someone who could pass for a casting director or second AD at a Hollywood premiere, maybe a producer's wife. I'm realistic, the local fashionistas are never going to have the kind of oomph the leading ladies of the silver screen do. For example, in 2008 it was the First Lady Evelin Ilves, both with the jacket and without, and in 2009 it was Keit Pentus and her unusual yellow design, that to this day I still can't entirely wrap my mind around. This is my selection for 2013. Just lovely. Perfect I'd say. I originally had two runners-up on my list, but after starting to write this, I realized one of them absolutely didn't deserve to be there, especially with the god awful hair and makeup she had, and the one I had in second place, really should be in third, making it a pointless list. So, I'm sticking with the one. And in conclusion, in the men's division, Tanel takes the cake. I wish there was a picture out there of just him! If there is, I couldn't find it. Hands down the most dapper gentleman there, way to go ;).

-O.
 
 

 

 

Feb.26rd Me in Mood

 

I'm very happy to kick off the year productively. I feel like I've taken far too much time off from doing what I love, just stumbling about, looking around and being content with everyday victories. Ironically, my first contribution to anything fashion related in 2013 is literally the result of not doing anything fashion related, at all. Funny how things work out?

 

  South Beach, Edgartown (photo: Olga Rattik)

I wrote a piece about the place I spent the majority of last summer, not with any overwhelming desire to have it published, just to have a subject and to discipline myself by writing down my memories while they were still fresh. A month, give or take, had passed since I'd come home and I thought it was the perfect time to take advantage of a settled, and hopefully accurate impression. I mentioned this as an idea to the editor in chief of Mood magazine, Kristi Pärn-Valdoja, she gave me a number (8000 characters, which seemed intimidating at first, but proved too constricting after I'd started) and sent me on my way. I gathered my thoughts a few days later, set an evening aside and wrote “The simple island life on Martha's Vineyard” in one sitting.

Worried I wouldn't remember enough interesting, unique and personal things to say about my life there, after I was done introducing the history, location, nature and trivia, I found myself running out of space to add any personal touches at all. Though it was a tight fit, I did manage to include the stargazing, the roadsters, the dinners and the hidden oasis's, through the eyes of an unusual kind of tourist.

I submitted the article to Kristi that night and a month later she said she would print it in the February issue of Mood. As an added bonus, I was also featured as one of the fashion-doers of the month. I took this very seriously, and decided to be worthy of the name by finishing this website, more than a year in the making (by this I mean having an idea, starting to work on it, changing my mind, starting over and repeating the process again and again). Not only was it a wonderful compliment, but an extremely motivating one too. Also, I made this promise on facebook, therefor it's legally binding!


Thank you to everyone who bought the magazine! Those of you who haven't, if you hurry you can still get it at some newsstands, although the March issue is already out, and those of you who can't read Estonian, do what I do when buying (foreign) magazines and enjoy the pictures =).

-O.

 

  Olga Rattik, Edgartown (photo: Joel Cristea)  

 

  Copyright © 2013 Olga Rattik. All rights reserved.